Instructions How to Write

Analysis on "How to Tame a Wild Tongue"

https://www.everettsd.org/cms/lib07/WA01920133/Centricity/Domain/965/Anzaldua-Wild-Tongue.pdf

Once you have completed your close reading and note-taking of How to Tame a Wild Tongue, take your annotations and transcribe them into a Word document. While doing so, think about what ideas are most important to you, and which other ideas are related to that idea (and “speak to it”). As part of this process, you have to find the main idea, or argument, or narrative/story of your own piece that is speaking to you from your notes. In other words, what stands out to you from your own response to the text? That is where you usually begin developing your analysis. For this to work effectively and efficiently, you must:
• Have sufficient notes that you can use them to produce ideas in sentences to create a chain of
argumentation (i.e., related paragraphs) that introduces, supports, and then concludes a main idea
that you develop.
• Be able to articulate an opinion on the subject you are writing on (an informed opinion), but also try to
apply that opinion towards more abstract or general ideas.
• Recognize and question your own relationship with the text to situate yourself within it.
C. Finding the Gap
Once you have an adequate base of notes from which to work, you are prepared to draft your analysis.
• Your analysis should focus on what is missing (in your own opinion) that can be filled in through
analysis. This is something that will bridge the “gap” between your own interest and understanding,
the text, and the audience. For example, thinking about how different Gloria Anzaldúa’s experience
might be growing up in 21 st Century New York. Or comparing your own experience with bi-lingualism (if you have it) to hers.
• As part of your analysis, you may summarize, evaluate, connect, and/or extend ideas from the source text with your own.
• As part of your analysis, you may reorganize the text around conflicting or conflicted viewpoints, contradictions, theses, factual information, or any other content found within the text itself.
• Your own analysis should have an introduction (written last), body, and (brief) conclusion.

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